CHAPTER 2 PDF

To see the digital edition of Suburani, click 'Open the Activebook' above, and try the Weblinks and other online support below.
We have also included a PDF of Chapter 2 of the textbook here for review. However, please note that PDFs of the chapters are not normally available online - the digital edition comprises the Activebook (above) and the further support (such as Weblinks, Image Gallery, etc.) below.

WEBLINKS
IMAGE GALLERY
A very tall monument with hieroglyphs up the side. On top is a circular metal ball with a spike.
The obelisk now stands in the Piazza di Montecitorio in Rome.
Both sides of a gold coin. One side shows the portrait head of an old man with a large nose, the other shows an arch with a cavalryman on top. The Arch of Claudius was built to celebrate Emperor Claudius’ conquest of Britain in AD 43. The arch has not survived, but we can get an idea of what it looked like from this coin.
A pathway with tombs on the left side and trees along the edge.
A Roman road (the Via Appia) lined with tombs, as it is now. Roman tombs were placed beside the roads outside the city boundary to separate the dead from the living.
A large white stone monument with carvings on the walls. One side has an opening and stairrs goign up to the inside.
The Ara Pacis was decorated with reliefs of processions, the imperial family, Roman gods, and important scenes from Rome’s legendary beginnings.
A towering aqueduct with two layers of arches stands in the centre of a modern town.
A Roman aqueduct. This one is in Segovia, in Spain.
A small model which shows various wooden huts with muddy paths going between them.
A model of the earliest settlement on the Palatine Hill.
An arched tunnel opening onto the a river. On the left a large bridge crosses the river. The tunnel has been bricked up.
The Cloaca Maxima ran under the city from the north-east, through the Roman Forum, and into the River Tiber at the Forum Boarium. It drained excess water and removed waste and sewage. Other smaller sewers were connected to the Cloaca Maxima, serving public toilets, baths, and public buildings. Romans believed that the goddess Cloacina looked after the sewer.
A modern townsquare. It is busy with activity and there are people shopping, chatting, and walking around at the market stalls. There is a church spire and the dome of a second church. Some buildings have Italian flags hanign from balconies.
Market square in the town of Mantua, Italy.
A long paved area with the remains of columns aroud the sides. At the end of the paved area is a building in red brick.
Photograph taken in the Roman Forum, showing the floor and column bases of the Basilica Aemilia in the foreground, and the side of the Senate House behind it. The Basilica Aemilia was a large hall where bankers and merchants conducted business.
A photo taken from a higher vantage pint looking down on the remains of the Roman forum. Some columns remain standing and on the right is a stone arch.
A basilica was a large public hall. There were two stretching along the sides of the Forum Romanum. Their colonnaded fronts provided shade for people to walk and socialize. The Basilica Julia housed the law courts.
Three Roman columns standing on a raised platform. The other remains of the temple are no longer standing. On the left is a modern building with stairs up to the front.
Concordia was the goddess who symbolized unity among the different classes of the Roman people. Her temple was a lavishly decorated marble building, and some of it still survives.
A curved stone wall fronted by four columns standing on a raised base.
Vesta was the goddess of the hearth and of fire. Roman temples were usually rectangular, but the shrine of Vesta was a small circular building. Inside the shrine was the sacred fire, which symbolized the survival and prosperity of Rome and was never allowed to go out.
A red brick building with a triangular roof. It has three windows on the front above a single door.
The Curia was the Senate House, where the emperor and Senate met to discuss affairs of government. The building which now stands in the Forum Romanum is a later restoration.
A panoramic view of the remains of the Roman Forum. A few columns stand at their original height, but most are stumps. One arch remains standing. In the background is the modern city of Rome and there are domes and spires.
The Forum Romanum today, facing the remains of the Temple of Concordia.
A dark ceramic cup with a narrow bottom. On the side is a dog running.
A cup showing a hunting dog.
A broken stone fragment with markings on in little squares, lines, and dots.
Fragments from the Fōrma Urbis Rōmae, the map of the city of Rome.
The Forma Urbis Romae was an enormous map, measuring about 60 x 43 ft and created around AD 211. Inscribed on stone was the plan of every architectural feature in the ancient city, from large public monuments to small shops. Only 10–15% of the original stone map survives, broken into 1,186 pieces.
A broken stone fragment with markings on in little squares, lines, and dots.
Fragments from the Fōrma Urbis Rōmae, the map of the city of Rome.
The Forma Urbis Romae was an enormous map, measuring about 60 x 43 ft and created around AD 211. Inscribed on stone was the plan of every architectural feature in the ancient city, from large public monuments to small shops. Only 10–15% of the original stone map survives, broken into 1,186 pieces.
A broken stone fragment with markings on in little squares, lines, and dots.
Fragments from the Fōrma Urbis Rōmae, the map of the city of Rome.
The Forma Urbis Romae was an enormous map, measuring about 60 x 43 ft and created around AD 211. Inscribed on stone was the plan of every architectural feature in the ancient city, from large public monuments to small shops. Only 10–15% of the original stone map survives, broken into 1,186 pieces.
A broken stone fragment with markings on in little squares, lines, and dots.
Fragments from the Fōrma Urbis Rōmae, the map of the city of Rome.
The Forma Urbis Romae was an enormous map, measuring about 60 x 43 ft and created around AD 211. Inscribed on stone was the plan of every architectural feature in the ancient city, from large public monuments to small shops. Only 10–15% of the original stone map survives, broken into 1,186 pieces.
One side of a stone altar. It is intricately carved. At the bottom left a wolf suckles two young children in a cave. On the bottom right an old man with a beard reclines. Above, an eagle sits on the left and two young men wearing caps stand. On the top left a shepherd boy sits with a staff. On either side of the image are two ram heads and garlands of vines.
Altar to Mars and Venus.
ACTIVITIES AND GAMES
MAPS
REFERENCE
DICTIONARY
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